More Interstellar Stuff, UFOs, and Evolution

My last post (Below) stirred a surprising – to me – level of interest in UFOs but few responses.  The comments made, though, were intriguing and the discussion brisk.  (I’ve always displayed a distinct preference for quality over quantity.)

At the gentle prodding of the few, but astute and passionate, commenters to that previous proposal, I did some superficial research.  In it, I happened upon news that is currently capturing headlines and seducing imaginations of space watchers around the globe: an Earth analog – Earth-like planet – had recently been discovered orbiting our nearest neighboring star in the Milky Way, Alpha Centauri B.  It was immediately and appropriately dubbed, Alpha Centauri Bb.

This new discovery is a world that Goldilocks would have little patience for; one of extreme heat beyond the human comfort zone with surface temperatures above 1,200° C.  But its binary star system may conceal more clement planets, and is of interest to science not only for its proximity to Earth, but this event marks the beginning of a new technological phase in exo-planet detection – those beyond our solar system.  That is where I leave them to their tech-world for travel in more mundane matters.

During that research, I further learned that there exist roughly 2 billion Earth twins in our own Milky Way galaxy, a substantially higher percentage than the “thousands” I used for example in posing my original question.  Recently, in 2011, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory calculated that from 1.4 to 2.7 percent of all sun-like stars have earth-like planets in their habitable (also called Goldilocks – not too hot, not too cold) zones, which computes to about 2 billion Earth analogs in the Milky Way alone, and as many as a sextillion in the entire universe.

Supersonic Flying Wing

That being the case, of an overwhelming numerical imbalance toward probability of alien visitors, it seems to me that, even absent any irrefutable proof, the likelihood of advanced (sapient) extraterrestrial life is practically a foregone conclusion.  I believe it.  When I was in college, I saw Arthur C. Clarke (Author, 2001….) on the Tonight Show; Johnny Carson asked him a similar question.  He laughed and said, “The universe is so vast, the probability of duplicates so high, I would be astonished if, at this very moment, there were not hundreds of other planets across the universe with people sitting in front of TVs tuned to the Tonight Show on each one!”

I discovered too, in my evidentiary search, a photo (shown above) that, if the claims of its subject matter and location are factual, is truly extraordinary.  (See later Post, Above)  It purports to show Travis Walton — the single-most-significant and recognizable UFO abductee (Nov., 1975; Snowflake, Arizona) — not in Kansas any more, or Arizona, standing in the doorway of an alien spacecraft, in a hangar at its home base — presumably an Earth analog planet.

Another photo that I found in that hunt was of an extraordinary hyper-sonic jet aircraft design that works around sonic boom and totally defeats it.  It can achieve Mach-5 in sonic silence. (boomless)

Popcorn time.

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